My name is danah boyd and I'm a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, a Research Assistant Professor in Media, Culture, and Communication at New York University, and a Fellow at Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Buzzwords in my world include: privacy, context, youth culture, social media, big data. I use this blog to express random thoughts about whatever I'm thinking.

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the last few days have been spent writing my final buddhism paper. (ok, so it has taken me more than just a few days… my writing WILL get better; determination is the key!) each nite, i have been reading school girls as a bedtime story. while reading mark’s comments on writing, i realized that i have always used the pronoun “he” when talking about a single non-gendered person. thinking back, i know this is because i always got in trouble for using “they” and “she” was never allowed in my formal writing classes. why? so as i was reading school girls, i also realized that even though i used “he,” the non-gendered character i envisioned had neither breasts nor penises. in addition, “it” never had hair. i firmly believe that this forcing of “he” only created a feeling within me emphasizing the super-importance as men, that they are the default sex. biologically, i know that is not true (as humans start out as women). how frustrating. i am determined to use “she” as much as possible now.

(Note: school girls is a non-fiction book about the confidence gap between men and women at puberty. it is an inside look at the difficulties that women experience and why they are so far behind men in many areas. it is a suberb book.)

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2 comments to

  • tanita

    csThis is very sadly, but such resource are exists:

  • William Ragrobes

    Your string of meditative reflections seem to have been broken some seven or so years ago. I do not know if this message will ever get to you, but the ability to relate to another, I belive, is another instance of our weak forms seeking solace in another. I belive humans have an instinctual want to find immortality, and this is embodied by whatever means, as long as it shouts out to the world, “look here, know that I once lived.” Therefore when one ceases to exist physically, or through his/her work, others feel a pain. Humans are generally bad at dealing with the unknown, and in this case, I cannot help but wonder, with fear, anticipation, combined with my general frustration, what might have become of you, and your words.

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