My name is danah boyd and I'm a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research and the founder/president of Data & Society. Buzzwords in my world include: privacy, context, youth culture, social media, big data. I use this blog to express random thoughts about whatever I'm thinking.

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what everyone should know about blog depression

Over at The Nonist, there’s a public service announcement concerning blog depression. To address this, jmorrison created an educational PDF to help you deal with depression.

To give you a sense, the first page asks what blog depression is. Some symptoms include:

  • Loss of pleasure in the internet
  • Feelings of sadness, disappointment, anger, self loathing, hopelessness, dimentia
  • Passive aggressive moaning and a steady lengthening of the interval between posts

Definitely take a look at it – i’m super curious what others think of this.

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7 comments to what everyone should know about blog depression

  • hey,

    since you are curious let me chime in:

    i’ve (obviously) been paying attention to the spread of this pamphlet since sunday went i put it up and it has proven to be very popular. on the one hand it’s meant to be humorous, and people are certainly taking it in that spirit, but on the other hand i think the strong reaction does point to some fairly large grains of truth nestled within.

    i know that i have felt a lot of the “symptoms” i put into the pamphlet. i created it durring a bout of dissatisfaction in point of fact. i’ve also seen many other bloggers complain, mope, moan, and eventually close up shop. so i think, joke though it may be, it struck a nerve.

    blogging is fascinating in that (professional / goods and services sites aside) it has no practical purpose. it is truly an art if looked at in those terms. it is such a new form, and such a public form, that the growing pains are uncommonly visible.

    i often feel the form is mutating right beneath our fingertips.

  • Joe

    This has long been a complaint of web workers of all stripes. I can’t tell you how many nights I’ve come home from work and proclaimed by undying hatred for the internet and the sickly glow of my display.

    Like any creative thing, Blogging is hard with a capital H (as you well know), but wonderful if you can get through the dark parts.

    Wait, don’t delete me! Was there a question in that post? Crap. Stupid Internet!

  • I linked to it at Blogebrity; I personally find some of the advice true and useful. But there’s so much equivocation that this true advice is buried under “but what the hell, do whatever.”

    I preferred the humor over Maddox’s under-par anti-blog rant.

  • i know that i have felt a lot of the “symptoms” i put into the pamphlet. i created it durring a bout of dissatisfaction in point of fact. i’ve also seen many other bloggers complain, mope, moan, and eventually close up shop. so i think, joke though it may be, it struck a nerve.

  • Chris Locke writes about “Indigo Children,” a meme reported on by the New York Times. The Indigo idea sounds like it pushes a whole bunch of buttons all at once – New Age, angels, the paranormal, child-worship, ADD. If it had some anti-child-porn hysteria about it, it’d be perfect. As one of the people in the NYT article says, this is basically the same social world view as Harry Potter’s muggles v. wizards set up.

    Anyway, it is a great example of what Chris has been talking about over at Mystic Bourgeoisie, America’s Toughest to Spell weblog

  • i believe the reason it’s so popular is because it kinda holds a drop of truth in it…

  • i firmly believe that the reason why the pamphlet is so popular s because it has a drop of truth in it…